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Readers Respond: Personal Stories from the Vietnam War

Responses: 13

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From the article: Timeline of the Vietnam War
Did you serve in the Vietnam War as a soldier, a medic, a nurse, a journalist? Were you an anti-war activist? Perhaps you have a spouse / aunt or uncle / parent who was there, and told you stories. Share your personal remembrances of the Vietnam War here. Tell Us Your Story

Things my dad told through his life

My dad was in the Big Red 1. He was awarded 2 Bronze Stars. He didn’t sit and brag, but sometimes he’d talk. And when he was dying he told me a couple things that happened. I have a yearbook he got for the Red 1 and there’s a map in the beginning. He’d put x’s where he fought. He was ashamed of some things and he had honor and loved this country very much. There was a time he slept on a grave in the woods with a Buddha statue to stay off the ground. (He felt real bad for that.) A time after a runway battle they had to eat and the bodies were bloating and air was leaking out of them. The first night there they dropped motors on them and he hid in the big tents, and the big tent over from them got hit right in the middle. He had a friend he played cards with and then one day he had to carry the guy’s legs back on a Huey. (Never touched cards again) One time they sat in a paddy and ate, he had his big knife laying beside him. They said, “Let’s go” and when he got up the knife was gone. They found a tunnel but the officer told them to come out.
—Guest GARRETT

danang 72

i got to spend about six months of my tour with my brother at marble mountain who was with the 282nd black cats. i don't know how many other brothers got to do this but it sure was a blessing to me. i was with the 11th cag. having him there to give me advice and direction help me settle in. we had quite a tour and i would love to share it someday with the world. god bless all the veterans who served this wonderful country.
—Guest roger petersen

my brother

I was in denver helping my brother to fill out the application to join the marines in 1966, he was only seventeen at the time. Went to war in Vietnam in 1967, was hit by the enemy where everyone except him died. Healed from his injuries and went back in to fight.
—Guest gail

Flying Death The Vietnam Experience

This book is about my time in the Marines and Vietnam. It gives a different view of the war as seen through the eyes of a combat helicopter crew chief. The perils of flying, some of the dangers of living in combat, along with some of the social issues of the time are brought to light. What were some of the daily pressures were that a flight crew had to deal with. A chopper and its crew has one mission - Support The Troops. Too many died trying to complete this mission. Take a walk in my shoes and feel what it is like to fly into combat. There is more to this story than what the title implies - there is a lot to learn.
—Guest Sam Beamon

Vietnam war

Actually my grandfather was in the Vietnam war and he has black outs still to this day and it isn't anything nice.
—Guest Anonymous

The Vietnam War?

I think the US should called " US, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia WAR" instead of only calling the "Vietnam War" alone. Because Laotians, Cambodians and also including Americans got nothing besides "Blood and Tear", but of course Vietnam Ho Chi Minh got a "Big Smiles" at the end.
—Guest Khieu Thy

Vietnam War

The Vietnam War drew attention Cambodia into the Killing Field by Pol Pot in 1975-1979. That time I was 14 years old, Khmer Rouge forced Cambodians who living in the cities and towns moved to rural areas where Pol Pot forced us working in rice-fields liked slave from earlier morning till late evening. As the result there were 2 millions of innocent Cambodians died by killing, by overworks, by starving and diseases. No Vietnam War No Pol Pot in Cambodia.
—Khieu

vietnam var

I was in the romanian military at the time of the vietnam war and we followed the course of the war every day. We were solders of a communist country, but i can tell you we solders were on the side of the americans and we were sure that the americans gone win that war. when the usa pulled out , we saw the reports about the vietcong victory in the tv we were shockt, we just could not believe it, and did not understand what happened, we could not find any explanations and we were in confusion and pain. In our eyes the image of usa was tarnisht.
—Guest gaborczirjak

My Dad Missed the Draft

I remember my dad telling me stories about narrowly missing the draft. He said that he and my mom would sit in front of the TV while they read the numbers announcing who was going and who was staying. He said he was always terrified it would be him, but he knew he'd do his duty if he had to. One night, they stopped just a few numbers shy of his draft number and he was never called. He said that was the day he felt lucky that he'd narrowly missed a spot on a plane that could've easily flew him into death, while some of his closest friends were drafted, then lost their lives overseas. His story still gives me chills.
—Kelly_Roell

Memories of Viet Nam

Hi everyone. My fiance' served three tours in Viet Nam, and I am writing stories about his experiences. He was career military so the stories will include other experiences he had in places such as Thailand, Greece, and Okinawa. My first two stories, both about Viet Nam, are here: http://hubpages.com/hub/Memories-of-Viet-Nam http://hubpages.com/hub/Memories-of-Viet-Nam-2 These are true stories and there will be many more, as I have time to write them. If you have the time, I would appreciate your feedback. There is a place to leave comments at the end of each story. I've really enjoyed reading about other experiences!
—Guest PrettyPanther

My Heart Would Pound

My brother was drafted into the Army and served in Vietnam. I was in college and every time I received an envelope with a red, white and blue border, my hands would shake fearing he would be writing from a hospital somewhere. It wasn't until he came home I learned he was a cryptographer who scrambled the "squawk" boxes or walkie talkies and didn't see any fighting. Thank God! He had a terrible time reacclimating to U.S. life after living in such extreme, surreal conditions -- easy access to drugs of all kinds, mamasans, a largely male society, long periods of inactivity followed by all-nighters packed with work. He doesn't talk about it much, even though I've asked him. I can imagine what it must be like for those who saw combat. It was a time that affected me deeply and still does.
—Barb.Rolek

Anxious times

I was a sophomore in high school when my older brother joined the marines and volunteered to go to VietNam. My personal feelings at the time were a combination of pride and extreme anxiety. Waiting and hoping for his next letter to arrive was nerve wracking to say the least. It didn't help things to watch the television news covering war protesters and later the My Lai massacre. I believe that my greatest lesson from the Viet Nam war was to be more critical in my thinking and not believe everything our government says is true. I find that when I make mistakes, I catch myself trying to justify my actions and I see our political leaders doing the same thing.
—Guest Louann

All I Know

I had two uncles who fought in Vietnam, one in the U.S. Marines and one in the Air Force. I've recently realized that I really don't know anything about their experiences over there. Basically, all I know is that one uncle (the Marine) came back with a serious case of malaria. The other was seriously injured, came back for treatment, and then was secretly sent back off the books when the fighting spilled over into Cambodia and Laos. I really need to interview them and learn more!
—kalliesz

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Personal Stories from the Vietnam War

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